Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Cricket: In defence of Faf du Plessis, the snail that sails across sandpaper
#1
[Image: 849x493q70Ant-Faf-du-Plessis.jpg]

As Faf du Plessis poked, prodded and nudged his way to a century in the first innings against New Zealand, the internet was discussing only one thing: his strike rate. What started off painfully slow eventually ended in a perfectly respectable strike rate of 47.86.

But Du Plessis has a reputation for being a slow-goer. In fact, since he made his Test debut in 2012, he has the slowest strike rate (39.76) of all Test batsmen who have scored more than 1,500 runs. He is the only player within those parameters with a strike rate of below 40.00.

Players with such low strike rates are often called “selfish” and it certainly doesn’t fit into the “modern era” of cricket where the top players have strike rates of over 50.00, but is it really such a bad thing? The short answer is no, the long answer is sometimes. Let’s look at some of these probables.

The one instance where a strike rate rarely matters is in the first innings. In the case against New Zealand, Du Plessis had all the time in the world to put an innings together. The weather was fine, the pitch was fine and while South Africa’s top order had all done a decent job, they needed somebody to go on and get a good score, which is exactly what Du Plessis did. With so much time left in the game, there was no need for him to go wild.

It is also an important role to play. Having a player anchor the batting allows other players to kick on and play their natural game, knowing that there is somebody stable at the other end.
The South African batsmen with a higher strike rate than Du Plessis in the first innings (who have played 10 or more Tests in the time period) are Hashim Amla (54.08), AB de Villiers (55.93) and Dean Elgar (50.03). When considering all the figures for the time period and using only recognised batsmen who have played five or more Tests in the time period
Overall, when looking at his strike rate of the first innings in isolation, Du Plessis’ rate sits at 44.35. This is a long way off from the player with the best strike rate in the first innings – Brendon McCullum, who has a rate of 92.83 for the period since Du Plessis made his debut – but it’s hardly a disaster. 
The second innings is often a bit more precarious. By now, the match is drifting somewhere and the batting team’s response is very much dictated by the situation. Some players might go into defence mode more than others. But even when taking these numbers in isolation, Du Plessis’ strike rate is comparable to that of his teammates.

In the second innings, Du Plessis’ strike rate is 41.46. Hashim Amla (42.46), AB de Villiers (56.10) and Alviro Petersen (55.89) are above him in the second innings strike rate stakes. Dean Elgar (39.13) and JP Duminy (35.37) are far slower (for players who have played 10 or more Tests). Again, when using the criteria for players with five or more Tests during this time period and considering only recognised batsmen

Source: Cricket Pakistan
Reply
#2
(09-01-2016, 07:33 PM)yass100 Wrote: [Image: 849x493q70Ant-Faf-du-Plessis.jpg]

As Faf du Plessis poked, prodded and nudged his way to a century in the first innings against New Zealand, the internet was discussing only one thing: his strike rate. What started off painfully slow eventually ended in a perfectly respectable strike rate of 47.86.

But Du Plessis has a reputation for being a slow-goer. In fact, since he made his Test debut in 2012, he has the slowest strike rate (39.76) of all Test batsmen who have scored more than 1,500 runs. He is the only player within those parameters with a strike rate of below 40.00.

Players with such low strike rates are often called “selfish” and it certainly doesn’t fit into the “modern era” of cricket where the top players have strike rates of over 50.00, but is it really such a bad thing? The short answer is no, the long answer is sometimes. Let’s look at some of these probables.

The one instance where a strike rate rarely matters is in the first innings. In the case against New Zealand, Du Plessis had all the time in the world to put an innings together. The weather was fine, the pitch was fine and while South Africa’s top order had all done a decent job, they needed somebody to go on and get a good score, which is exactly what Du Plessis did. With so much time left in the game, there was no need for him to go wild.

It is also an important role to play. Having a player anchor the batting allows other players to kick on and play their natural game, knowing that there is somebody stable at the other end.
The South African batsmen with a higher strike rate than Du Plessis in the first innings (who have played 10 or more Tests in the time period) are Hashim Amla (54.08), AB de Villiers (55.93) and Dean Elgar (50.03). When considering all the figures for the time period and using only recognised batsmen who have played five or more Tests in the time period
Overall, when looking at his strike rate of the first innings in isolation, Du Plessis’ rate sits at 44.35. This is a long way off from the player with the best strike rate in the first innings – Brendon McCullum, who has a rate of 92.83 for the period since Du Plessis made his debut – but it’s hardly a disaster. 
The second innings is often a bit more precarious. By now, the match is drifting somewhere and the batting team’s response is very much dictated by the situation. Some players might go into defence mode more than others. But even when taking these numbers in isolation, Du Plessis’ strike rate is comparable to that of his teammates.

In the second innings, Du Plessis’ strike rate is 41.46. Hashim Amla (42.46), AB de Villiers (56.10) and Alviro Petersen (55.89) are above him in the second innings strike rate stakes. Dean Elgar (39.13) and JP Duminy (35.37) are far slower (for players who have played 10 or more Tests). Again, when using the criteria for players with five or more Tests during this time period and considering only recognised batsmen

Source: Cricket Pakistan

Without reading the whole post, all I will say is Australia could really use 1 or 2 Du Plessis' right now, A Rogers/Langer type. I watch test cricket, and rate it above all others for the long battles and have no problem with players taking their time.
"I'm not saying it's ugly but, that tackle clearly wouldn't get many valentines cards" - Eddie Hemmings '17
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)